Day 12-Love Poem

Today’s post is supposed to be a poem to somebody you love. However, in the 30 Days of Blogging contract, I saw no stipulation against using previous work. And so, I present the infamous Ode to A8. For those of you that have already experience the magic of the vending machine poem, enjoy again! For those of you who haven’t…boy, are you in for a treat 🙂

Ode to A8

The clock strikes 12, and it’s that time again.

I make my fateful walk out of the door,

And while I pledged I would try to refrain,

The flesh is weak, and I come back for more.

My journey ends–I stop before the shrine

Which shall my soul and stomach feed in time.

Preserver of life! Sweet manna to my soul-

Blessed by the vending machine-grand and black.

But what to choose! My eye is drawn to red

And gold, sweet morsels of delight my goal.

The A comes first, number 8 my fingers tread;

I’ve punched the numbers in–no turning back!

The grinding of the cogs, and then it quits

And I enjoy my precious Cheesy Ritz Bits.

The Saga Continues

Oh, you thought you were done with my little Ritz Bitz obesession? Think again. It turns out that my little Ode to A8 was only the beginning of the adventure. Read on to hear about my latest encounter with the cheesy delights.


As stated previously, I had to write Ode to A8 for my British Literary History class. Today we broke into small groups and read each of our poems. I was quite impressed by everyone else’s poems and thought they were far more thought-provoking than my simple, but beloved, tribute to my favorite snack. However, when asked to share with the class, I was somehow nominated from my group. You have to understand–each poem presented before mine had some deep philisopical language and somehow managed to decode the mysteries of the universe in a mere 14-line sonnet. However, I had been chosen to share my work with the world, and I could not back down. I prefaced it by explaining I wrote about something that truly inspired me, and began reading my poem. The words flowed easefully from my lips, seeming to spin a tapestry of imagery before my audience’s eyes. And when I reached the end, where I finally confessed my love for the cheesy treat, my listeners’ eyes were glistening with tears. So what if they were tears of laughter? I know deep down, they, too, were touched by the power of Ritz Bitz.

It was kind of fun afterwards when the members of my class were supposed to identify the elements of Romanticism I had used in my poem. Someone pointed out the way I had made something seemingly mundane and trivial into something extraoridnary, and one girl remarked it reminded her of Lord Byron’s poem Don Juan in its representing the tantilizing temptation. My professor added it that this temptation was probably a little more appropriate for BYU than the account of Donna Julia and Don Juan..ahem…”discussing” things. When he asked me, I told my professor that the vending machines right outside were the source of my inspiration, and he laughingly expressed the need to check out A8 someday. After a few more chuckles from the class, we were dismissed, and I headed out to the library to get a few things done before work. No sooner had I left the room when I saw half of my class standing contemplatively at the vending machines outside the door, a few of which expressed their desire to get their hands on those delicious “morsels of delight”. Percy Shelley often remarked that he saw poets as “prophets”, or the “unacknowledged legislators of the world”. Today, I feel like I got a glimpse of what he meant.

Oh yeah, I’m a poet. 🙂

Ode to A8

I had to write a poem in the British Romantic Style for my Brit-Lit class, and my mom really wanted me to post the finished product up here. But first, for a little explanation on the Romantic Style:
British Romanticism is chiefly characterized by feeling. Several poets of the era were fascinated with the idea of exotic things (a movement we in the English spheres like to call Orientlaism.) The concept of strange and other-worldly ocurrences also sparked their interest, which led to the Gothic style. Gothicism was captured beautifully in Colerisge’s modern epic “Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner” (which is actually a pretty cool poem-it has a Pirates of the Caribbean feel to it. Interested? Click here.) Not all poetry from this era was as grandiose and mystical as the two previous cateogries, however. Poets like Wordsworth (my personal favorite) wrote specifically about nature and the deep feelings that it evoked from their very souls. These poems utilized flowery and grandiloquent words to exress the innermost passions of their emotions. (or as Gilbert Blythe once so eloquently put it: “High-Falutin Mumbo Jumbo”. Thank you, Lucy Maude Montgomery).
I decided to put all of my Highfalutin Mumbo Jumbo skills to work in the following sonnet, in which I express my innermost admiration for something that has become quite dear to me–the vending machines in the Talmage building.

Ode to A8

The clock strikes 12, and it’s that time again.
I make my fateful walk out of the door,
And while I pledged I would try to refrain,
The flesh is weak, and I come back for more.
My journey ends–I stop before the shrine
Which shall my soul and stomach feed in time.
Preserver of life! Sweet manna to my soul-
Blessed by the vending machine-grand and black.
But what to choose! My eye is drawn to red
And gold, sweet morsels of delight my goal.
The A comes first, number 8 my fingers tread;
I’ve punched the numbers in–no turning back!
The grinding of the cogs, and then it quits
And I enjoy my precious Cheesy Ritz Bits.

Oh, yeah. I’m a poet. 🙂